a podcast by Pawlean

Do you have creator anxiety? A conversation with Clark Narvas about being a creator, communities, anxiety on creating and more!

September 01, 2020 Pauline Narvas Season 1 Episode 3
a podcast by Pawlean
Do you have creator anxiety? A conversation with Clark Narvas about being a creator, communities, anxiety on creating and more!
Chapters
00:01:19
Clark's Creator Journey
00:06:19
Finding communities
00:10:43
Filming Hackathons at The University of Sheffield
00:13:42
Does consistency matter?
00:17:25
The Impact of Creating
00:21:56
Content Anxiety, Imposter Syndrome & Haters
00:36:24
Advice to those starting out
a podcast by Pawlean
Do you have creator anxiety? A conversation with Clark Narvas about being a creator, communities, anxiety on creating and more!
Sep 01, 2020 Season 1 Episode 3
Pauline Narvas

In this episode, I speak to Clark Narvas about how he started his creator journey. He shares his story from enjoying watching TV idents, filming his first 'tech review' and building his niche and finding a community. We also chat about 'creator anxiety' and dealing with haters. Thoroughly enjoyed this one! Remember to check Clark's stuff out at links.clarknarvas.com!

Let's connect:

Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

In this episode, I speak to Clark Narvas about how he started his creator journey. He shares his story from enjoying watching TV idents, filming his first 'tech review' and building his niche and finding a community. We also chat about 'creator anxiety' and dealing with haters. Thoroughly enjoyed this one! Remember to check Clark's stuff out at links.clarknarvas.com!

Let's connect:

Pauline Narvas :

Hello, and welcome to another episode of a podcast by Pauline. today. I'm actually here with my brother, Clark Narvas, who's like a guest today I guess. I guess today I guess. Haha. We actually wanted to do this as sort of like an ad hoc thing. We had like an idea. We were like, We might as well like give it a go. We're basically today we're going to talk about content creator stuff. The reason we wanted to do this is I've always wanted to have like a guest on this podcast and I know I'm going to put some like inspiring figures, snippets on everything, but I wanted this to be a bit different to like inspiring figures. So we're sort of just gonna talk and it helps because I'm in Sheffield right now with my family and so we actually stop opposite each other face to face. Hi. So um

Clark Narvas :

yeah, I guess this is like my big break. Talks big break. I'm famous though. Hi mom.

Pauline Narvas :

She can hear us. You know what, let's start with like our creative journeys. I'm not gonna go on about mine because I feel like a lot of people know mine already who follow me on like social media and like, they're quite familiar with what I do. So Clark, do you want me to like talk through? Like, what has inspired you to start your own like creative journey online and being like a quote unquote, content creator? And yeah, just talk a little bit about how you got started.

Clark Narvas :

So what do I start? I don't know if I should go from like that straight straight start off. I should just like, you know,

Pauline Narvas :

I think you should go from the star like the star star because like I think people need to know Like, where your potential and your interest started? Because it's really interesting, isn't it?

Clark Narvas :

Yeah. So when I was really, really young around like four or five, I used to watch TV and I always used to, like, imitate TV presenters.

Pauline Narvas :

Yeah, he did

Clark Narvas :

a video of me, I think,

Pauline Narvas :

I think I do. Yeah, somewhere.

Clark Narvas :

Yeah, it's just me, me pretending to be like, BBC Radio or something was a BBC Radio,

Pauline Narvas :

there was one of X Factor. And that's basically just like a big like size story. But like, I'm sure everyone went through this phase, but like my family, and I used to watch X Factor a lot. We used to tune into Xbox or like every Saturday or whatever it was, and the clock was growing up. And he also tuned in as well. And he used to, like he said, imitate like the dermatome.

Clark Narvas :

I also really use the light Like the X Factor intro The X Factor x. Um, I remember by this there's a story. My mom, my mom's fans actually used to always cut out an x like an X factor x. My dad then because I was a huge techie I was an absolute huge techie. And I'd done my dad's gave me when he got an iPhone he gave me his iPhone. What I do in my free time from then on, was watch iPhone adverts.

Pauline Narvas :

As soon as he started watching those iPhone, Android, some apple adverts and stuff. You just like, loved it. I remember we went to like the Apple Store. And then you did like a little review. This was way before YouTube, like tech reviewers on YouTube as well. Remember they had like a What was it like? He used like my dad's phone to take like a mini little like review in the Apple Store, the new iPad, the first ever iPod.

Clark Narvas :

So I am also I also used to watch so many tech youtubers when I was younger. Like this is the fall at Tech tubers burn like YouTube UI in the world like mainstream. I started getting really into it. That's

Pauline Narvas :

for those who don't know, what isn't IBM

Clark Narvas :

so you know, between the programmes on TV, there's this there's like this little video with the logo on like ITV BBC. That is an ident and I used to be basically addicted to it. I used to actually watch him all the time. And like I used to watch a continuity and continuity is like the adverts in between like the graphics, his trailer, you know, the trailer. Like the trailer and boards and everything the presentation of them. And I basically about addicted to that. That's kind of how I developed my branding.

Pauline Narvas :

I remember when you used to watch all these items like again and again on repeat and like you'd have, I think that's what helped you develop a sharp eye in terms of like, now today, when you're creating, I've seen you create so many amazing things for for like my stuff, but also other people that you've done that for and it's like, so cool to, to see that something you were really passionate about. That's also quite a niche thing. Because like I feel like not many people really know much about it or know anything about it for that matter. So knowing that you develop that at quite a young age is like really impressive. And it's definitely transition to what you are doing right now. And so yeah, so then after you got obsessed with all those items and stuff that sort of developed as like a hobby for you, didn't it? And he just sort of kept building that up.

Clark Narvas :

Shall I tell you like the weird story about how I actually got into and like sort of content creation. Okay, so basically one day Wow, I actually, I wanted to make a game. You know, I really wanted to make a game. So I searched on Google, like, like, I think it was like seven, eight year old me. How do I make a game and then I found the game called like a game creation thing called Roblox and I was so amazed that I actually was basically Minecraft but much better on this thing called CBBC Roblox for you who for people who are actually just outside of the UK CBBC is like a it's actually just like a children's TV channel here in the UK. And those are CBC Roblox HQ. And then it all just escalated from there. And then I created my own competing thing of like CBC It was like BBC vote blocks afterwards found this other Roblox TV. Yet this other Roblox CV thing. I basically contacted it. So I was just like, hey, he was actually quite nice to me. And then from then on, I became a Roblox TV news presenter

Pauline Narvas :

right now you're cringing at that fact. I'm like, I know, it's sort of like embarrassing because whenever I think back at the things that I did when I was younger, and I was like growing up online, it's like, quite embarrassing, but at the same time, it's really cool because what you basically did is I found a very niche community within a game, which had, which, you know, contained a lot of people who were also interested in the same thing. And so, because of that you sort of brought something that you were really passionate about that was really nice, which is you know, presenting and TV shows and stuff a media, especially at your age. You found it in an online community. Then you just sort of run with it, didn't you?

Clark Narvas :

I created like wix.com websites which was like as I'm creating my own Roblox Digital Service, like did like TV service like sky I basically just had like my channels and then a bunch of other people's channels and I also don't develop my video editing skills and yeah about what my video editing skills about but on my live streaming skills as well that's how I've managed to do inspiring figures.

Pauline Narvas :

And I mean, that's amazing because like I said, he found a community, build up your, your skills learned from other people. And that's, that's incredible. Honestly, it's so cool. And like today, like you said, Now, now you're doing your own thing. You've got clock now calm, which is your blog, but also you've got all of the different like, creative stuff that you do on your YouTube Channel and all sorts of stuff. So that's really, really cool. Now, obviously people a lot of people who are listening to my podcast now and who know of you through me have been impressed by what you've managed to create for everything Pauline. Like, I wish I could take Well, I can't. It's all me like I used to joke about how my brothers literally like my brand manager, but that is, that's pretty much true. You've even written like, brand documents for me.

Clark Narvas :

You know, like I I've actually given her so many lectures about consistency. And thank you Lambinon because I actually watched a lecture from you and there was like, it was about bank consistency. But

Pauline Narvas :

a lot of people aren't aware like, whenever someone sees like a graphic on Pauline calm or anything on my social media that immediately like, Oh my god, how did you do this? And then I'll always link back to you and say like my brother today, he's like, incredible. stuff like this clock novastar calm everything. I'm always like pointing them in your direction. But then like, like, I don't think people, like understand or are aware of how you became so good at what you're doing now. And going back to, you know, your journey from the very beginning. And it's very nice and very like you wouldn't. I feel like this has happened a lot in our family where we, we just start from a very like young age, we do random stuff. And that interests those and then eventually, it becomes like, such a successful thing and something that we can really use to help with our like own career. One of the most impressive things that you did over the last few years, was actually attending a university hackathon. That's pretty cool. And I really just just wanted to briefly talk about it because that's, like still really flippin cool. So for those who don't know, I'm Matt My my partner, he actually managed to get Clarke into a hackathon that he was helping out in so his hack Sheffield back in 2017. He got involved in the hackathon. And that was pretty cool. Can you just like tell us like how you felt when you know, we got you at the university to create like this video for a society.

Clark Narvas :

I was Batman, I was actually very, very imaginative. Very, like, so imaginative. I'd have like loads of scenes in my head, how I pan like plan out the entire thing. And I actually took so many shots I've never used but we're still kind of the core. It was a is quite some is something to look back on. I do so I do. I do it a lot differently now than I would have done it before. But the whole thing. I think it was quite cool to do but like

Pauline Narvas :

and then it The following year, you got you involved in the hackathon Iran hack command. 2018. Um, that was really fun because like, again, you brought to life hackathon. That is like, let's be honest, a hackathon. Isn't that exciting, especially like, over the 24 hours, you obviously you're like working together to build something incredible over the next 24 hours, you make friends, it's all really cool. But like trying to capture that in the video can be quite difficult when everyone is just like coding away, hacking away on their like laptop stuck for 24 hours. But obviously, we have like different activities that people can get involved in. So for hack med, I did like a little meditation slash yoga stretching session. And he managed to capture a bit of that, which was really cool. And like, and yes, if you all put that together, and if anyone wants to, like actually watch these videos, they're on Clark's YouTube channel and they're really, really good. I think I like looking back at them because it reminds me of how I felt at that time. And I think it really just captured how much hype these hackathons. Like, get and how, when you are in the moment, and you're like, experiencing them with like a group of people who are just like you, it's just so exciting and really, really cool. So I just want to talk about those pieces of work and your those projects because they were so cool. And honestly, like, even today, they provide a lot of value. And we can go back in time and like, you know, say that you were part of that. And, you know, I think I'm just excited to see what you can get involved in and what else you can bring to life in the future in 2018. We also did a quick video on my YouTube channel, about consistency. Just wanted to ask, what Where do you stand today about unlike consistency, so for those who don't know we did this YouTube video, we went to our local park and we'll just talk through how We think in terms of like, making content consistent consistently. And if consistency is more important than anything else, I argued in 2018. But consistency is so important, because I can see it in my own like health and wellness journey. I know that just being consistent, even though you don't feel like it can have like a snowball effect. But you argue differently differently Didn't you know, I mean, my thoughts have changed a little bit. I'm gonna be honest with you, because in 2018, I was full of energy, I just graduated, you know, like, I still had all that energy like from being a student, but then I started working. I like working or working can be quite draining when you have like, you know, you need to go to work and you have all these like, adult responsibilities that I just didn't have back when I was a student. So I think my view has changed a little bit on that like, I mean for me now it's post whenever you want to It doesn't have to be consistent. It's your online space and your Creator space is everything. It's, it's yours. So you can do whatever you want. Even if it's not, even if you only post like, once in a while, it's like, whatever, just do your thing.

Clark Narvas :

I think consistency does matter, consistency really does matter. But firstly, actually, it really is a key part when you're growing, when you're growing your content when you're growing everything. It's a really, really, really, really, really key part in branding. I think you should have the ability to change your mind and you shouldn't be consistent so much to the point that's unhealthy. But I think you can probably say that about content right now is because because you're not actually growing and presence well. Well, you've already got that, well, you are growing in presence, but people already know you, too, or you're already you're already getting those that reach through but your shares and other people Turning at you. And really, if you're just starting from substances key, do what you want. Yeah, just have the time to do what you

Pauline Narvas :

it's a more balanced approach for me now because like even though creating content and being consistent is really good for like building a online presence and this poll like quote unquote, personal branding, I hate that word. I think it's really great. You know, consistency is important for that. But like, at the same time, I've got to a position where, even though I know consistency matters to an extent, even as you're like growing, I've decided to take more of a sustainable approach towards my content creation. And so some days if I even though I scheduled the I need to like sit down and write a blog post or create some sort of content today. I decide that actually, that's it's okay. If I don't do that. It's okay if I like just don't, don't do anything. Anything productive. You know, I think mental health matters. And that's, you know, this culture but we have in terms of like hustling and building God brands, it's too much pressure. And you know, content creation at the end of the day should be a fun thing. But consistency does have a bit of an impact. So yeah, I think it's just whatever works for you It differs individual to individual. You know, one of the things like I love about creating is the fact that you create content, and it can. It goes two ways. For me personally, when I create stuff, it benefits me because it's sort of like so like, for me, I know it sounds so weird, but when I'm writing a blog post, it is really therapeutic. All in all, writing blog posts, and creating content for me has been quite a nice therapeutic activity and also it helps like you just like you touched on like, building my own skills, especially for me like the skills that are more clear. Rather than like, more technical skills, it's been really nice. It like suits my brain. That sounds really weird, but that's actually the case. And then on the other hand, you don't you don't really know who you can impact and like, I never thought the stuff that I've created online would have such a positive impact in people's lives. But it has done

Clark Narvas :

talking about impact though. Um, you know, it's kind of links of consistency as well. Someone wants actually. So what my friends they introduced this my back end, where they introduced my friends my content, and they thought I was famous. Before I was famous because about how organised everything is, and I have actually been told by a few people, I'm inspirational, and I'm like, g okay

Pauline Narvas :

to react to component like because I got them through. I get people say like, I love all the stuff that you do. You're so inspiring. You've movement motivated me to do this. And sometimes it's like massive life changes. I'm like, Oh shit. I've ever really done that. That's amazing.

Clark Narvas :

Yeah, it's like you don't know. This is the beauty about creating content. It's like, you do not know who you are, who you are, who you are going to affect. And it's like, when you do it's just,

Pauline Narvas :

it's mind blowing, isn't it? Yeah, totally. I mean, it's, it's great. Like, personally, I've had moments where it's sort of like, freaked me out what impact I've made to someone's life. Like when you really think about it, it's just absolutely insane. Um, there was this one time I went to a conference actually. And it's actually really strange. Well, I share this story. I absolutely like loving I get. I get really emotional when I talk about it, but I went to a conference and One of the people who was at the conference actually came up to me and they were like, Oh my god, I love your content polling. I like I love your blog. I love everything you stand for. And you know, I love your your content. And then they stopped crying. And I just didn't know what to do. I was like, Oh my god, and she was they were like, your your content just really speaks to me, especially a recent post you posted about like taking control of your mental health prioritising self care that really spoke to me and then they share the story about like battling social anxiety and depression and stuff like that and how they needed to improve their confidence. And when they stumbled upon my blog, and they've been following my journey, they were like, Oh my god, this is just fantastic. And I literally was tearing up I was so shocked. I didn't know what to do. Everyone leaves like look the horn like a gasp like I've no idea It's a how to, like, interact with this right now by ended up giving her a hug and it was like so lovely. And you know, it's one of the it's moments like that, that I think back and I'm like, I love what I'm doing here. Like it's a part time thing. It's something I enjoy, and I'm always gonna enjoy. But the impact I've managed to make is incredible. You know, though, I actually think soon, like, we might actually be blogging about the same things.

Clark Narvas :

Because it's like

Pauline Narvas :

a blog post about digital declutter. And I literally have on my list of things to write about, because, yeah, and then when I saw you arrive, I was like, Oh, my god, that was like, that was a topic. I mean, like, that's the thing though. That's the beauty about like content creation. Everyone has a different spin to things. Everyone has unique experiences. So people can reason I talked about all of the, you know, the impact that I've made and how how valuable blogging and content creation has been for me is the fact that even though like people have seen my stuff, and they're like, Oh my God, you're so confident and oh my god, I love your stuff. I still get really bad imposter syndrome. And I still get really anxious. When, like content anxiety. Yes, exactly. Content anxiety. And yeah, just wanted to talk about that. I think I think

Clark Narvas :

all going so huge.

Pauline Narvas :

I think we all we, I mean, I'm sure everyone who ever posted anything online or like done anything and like the content creation space has felt like this before as well. But sometimes I feel I feel really, I feel too anxious to like, publish things. So for the longest time, I don't, I think it was, end of 2018 to like, almost all of 2019 and sometimes I some, like even today, but I actually schedule all of my Post I cannot I repeat cannot click that publish now button. In the moment I have to schedule it in advance because of anxiety. Um, have you ever felt like,

Clark Narvas :

um, what question do you like both cry all your posts, so you start the month?

Pauline Narvas :

Sometimes it just depends on how like, if I'm in that groove, and then if I'm in that mood,

Clark Narvas :

how do you vote so much?

Pauline Narvas :

Well, I do, like you're running out of time, right? Dig in that like you're running out of time.

Clark Narvas :

I'm actually quite impressed. Oh, thank you. Um, I'm trying to write my next blog post. I feel like I got like a writer's block, right?

Pauline Narvas :

Yeah, I mean, that's completely fine. I've also had writer's block, here and there and sometimes like, when I think back when, why I have this writer's block in and stuff like that. I realised that I really just, I put a lot of pressure on myself to really produce the thing when it shouldn't be like that. And whenever I have moments where I am putting a lot of pressure on myself, I realised that actually this isn't what you know, blogging and content creation is for me, it should be an enjoyable thing and a therapeutic thing for me It shouldn't be forced. So whenever I like sort of switch my mind to that, it's just so much better. I just feel a lot better about

Clark Narvas :

it back to content anxiety. Yes, I do actually have really bad content anxiety. I have been made fun of several times at school about my content. So they sell you some good shade for by shade fever here. So, one my first encounters was my I actually hadn't blogged before, like a blog. I don't think I don't think you know about this. I had the blog before. It was like my first first blog. You probably knew really I don't know about this. It's good. It was cringy as hell actually reading back a number is actually quite cute at the same time. Um, yeah, um, people would be back. People would read them might be like, Oh, well, I would say to me, Hey, I'm gonna read your blog at night. Tomorrow, something like that. Yeah, I'm gonna read your blog tonight. And then and then with la fire.

Pauline Narvas :

Yeah, I've had a similar thing when I was growing up because I had my blog when I was younger going through school on schools just a bit. Oh, I like people have children. I mean, is all I'm gonna say but I also got bullied for like, some of my content. I used to draw like designs of my blog. And then like, there was this one particular person that springs to mind who literally just laughed at me was like, Oh my god, you're such a boffin. You're so sad for you know, doing About for writing for like, spending your free time to like, draw what you want your website layout to look like and stuff like that. And then yeah, and it was hard it was tough especially growing up

Clark Narvas :

as a member when someone like a some kind of Filipino gathering type thing. He's he said to me but my but my Instagram was sad.

Pauline Narvas :

He spent more of your energy attacking someone than if you just chilled out like I just, I don't like it. It doesn't sit well with me and it might be because I was bullied quite a lot when I was younger, but I don't stand for it when it happens. Like with my brother, I mean, I could talk about I could we could talk we could sit here and talk about bullying. Maybe that's a whole different episode in itself. But, you know, at the end of the day, if you don't like someone's content or you don't understand why they're doing something that they love, just leave you know, just don't follow

Clark Narvas :

them. Have you had like an entire year and a bit experiencing this, but, um, I'd have people talking about my podcast. Clark, I'm gonna listen to you. I'm gonna go and they're basically making fun of me for my podcast, and they'd listen to it in class. And they'd be like, Clark has a podcast. And then they laugh about the idea.

Pauline Narvas :

I remember, you know, people coming on my blog and like, Look, you know, looking at my stuff and being like, Oh my God, why do you do that? I mean, when I was at university, there was a girl who went up to me, and she was like, well, she obviously followed followed me on some sort of social media. I mean, I was very open about like, the content I was creating. And she went up to me and she was like, I don't really understand why you write blog posts. You write essays every single week. I just I Just don't understand it. And I remember like she said it in quite a loud voice. And there were quite a lot of people around us. And I remember just feeling this like, like embarrassment. I was like, oh my god. Well, that's the thing, right? Like, nowadays, I'm trying to, like, become more time to like, embrace a bit more and be like, yes, this is what I do online, and I really love it. And, you know, this, yes, I spend a lot of my time and effort into this. I'm sorry, I'm not like you, you know, I mean, but yeah, I remember just being really embarrassed. And like, since that day, I've, you know, I've, I've tried to avoid public conversations about it in person, but you can't be avoided when it's like such a huge part of me. And like, like you said, like, I should be proud of it. And one of my goals in 2019 and in 2020, was to embrace my, the content I create and be proud of what I've created with Pauline. So I feel like I'm slowly becoming better at that unlike, especially this year, I've really gone out of my shell I've spoken at loads of conferences about blogging and content creation. And you know, like, you know, we went to that radio station in Sheffield, we talked about it as well and it was such a great opportunity so

Clark Narvas :

Oh, I remember this one time it was basically basically you ago now is the Spotify song. Oh, yes. Someone someone though. Okay. So basically someone wrote a song about me and talked about things about how it like a nerd and like high tech foundation maths and stuff. And how am I and how, and hi like, did a podcast called tech by and I remember just like that day I just I saw I thought they were all joking until I actually searched it up. And then I saw the The song name clock. And that, yeah, so the song name clock. And like their faces are just, and they didn't want to play it. So afterwards I just basically ranted to you. And then you and then you wrote an entire email

Pauline Narvas :

thing. Like, again, we can talk about this in a whole different episode. But like very briefly, this is why I think I'm sort of behind him grow up in this age. Why like social media and Instagram and like the internet was like, so open that someone could like openly bully someone like that. So that's why I was really passionate about it. And I was really behind and I was like, I wrote this really long email and I said, this is not on shared on social media. So this is not on. Yeah, and I was really behind it. I'm really anti bullying, especially when like people and you know, especially when people are just doing what they love, and you know, it It's the thing is like what we're doing online and what we're creating, again, no one is obliged to like, look at it, no one is obliged to follow along or whatever, you can literally unfollow and just not be a part of it. But people spend extra energy just to be mean or just to troll or the portraits of each of our when this really no need. And it's just, it's just not cool. And that's why like, when incidents like these happen, it's really quite sad. And it's quite like it exhausts scares people off in content creation, and like just being creative and doing stuff like this. And also, I'm not surprised that a lot of people don't create content under their name. But at the same time, what I what we're trying to get across is that we are trying to get ourselves across to specific audiences and we want it to be personal. So we want to use our names. We want to show our personality quickly. What we're trying to say is content creation

Clark Narvas :

is cool. You don't have to worry about it, but One last thing. I told you this turned into a proper I think we ranted about this about like 20 minutes now is it? Um, okay, so this is something I find really ironic. So, um, I actually, there was a girl who actually went up to me and said, Clark, I really love your podcast. It gives me extra brain cells. Yeah, they said to me, they said that to me, they said that to me, I'm

Unknown Speaker :

so cool. I listen to it every night. And then I'm just

Clark Narvas :

I mean, I mean that's creepy, but thank you for the views and just imagine just like one viewer, but and then this year. I did. I was doing some kind of q&a thing and I got a message I got like message will not be message but like a q&a thing from that girl. And then she asked me this is probably sarcastic, but I'm gonna pretend that wasn't How are you so confident? And I'm just like

Pauline Narvas :

it's because of you me because of you give me the viewer and because of your like support, I am so much more competent. You you sort of reminded me of how I've had people like for example, on YouTube, I don't know who it is, but there's someone who is who is like subscribed to me I think the subscribe to me or I think they have like about like, they get notifications whenever I post anything or whenever I go live on youtube, but they there's someone who like, hates my stuff, and they are constantly disliking all of my videos without fail. I remember I tweeted about it and I was like, like whoever This is, they missed the video. Link the YouTube video. Like a few minutes later, it was someone disliked it, but maybe that was just a troll on Twitter but like, I don't know, I don't know why but it's like, it's like, you know, we have to find ways to deal with like the haters and this content anxiety but because of like negative feedback that we get, sometimes it's really difficult to, like, stay afloat to like, stay motivated to continue what we're doing because sometimes like whenever you get like attacked like that, or whenever, you know, someone like at school or whatever, like a university comes up to you and asks you, why the heck are you doing that and like, attacking you, and then it can come across as like, you sort of just want to give up and like, take a step back and just disappear. But like, for me, I've always just been like, Okay, I'm feeling like this now. And sometimes. I actually do take a few like days just to chill out and just to be like, you know what, I'm going to take a break from creating stuff because like, I just don't feel like it right now. And that's the effects of it. anxiety. I still don't know how to like deal with it. Taking a step back has definitely like helped. And also just remembering how effing awesome I am. Yeah. So I just think that, you know, content anxiety is a real thing and like it's okay to, um, to feel it, I think, you know, dealing with it in your own different ways. It's completely okay. I'm not going to tell you what to do to deal with it. I'll do this to do this because they always differs as well, because sometimes I just feel like mentally strong, I can deal with stuff like that, but some days, I'm not I just don't want to deal with it at all. So it just really depends, isn't it?

Clark Narvas :

I wrote like a very like a quite personal birthday post. And, like after like the morning afterwards, I just didn't want to look at my blog, because I have my proper content, anxiety.

Pauline Narvas :

I buffer all of my posts so I don't have to like deal with anxiety. You need your D got by now. Even though we're like quite, um, I want to say like in quotation marks confident or if like what we post, there are some sort of Yeah, there's still some sort of like imposter syndrome and anxiety that comes in every post things. So just to like conclude this episode, I wanted to ask one question from one creator to another. For anyone who's like listening who wants to get started in their creative journey, what would your your main advice be? My key one would be,

Clark Narvas :

don't give enough. Don't give enough. My second one would be don't care about the equipment. I mean, really, and your career even if you use your mobile phone, just like your phone to film stuff, even if you don't have a good video editor. And even if you're just using iMovie, as your as much as the creator as it Um, you know as much as a curry as Pauline is your as much as the creator as like so on big like mkbhd who has like these big massive combat cameras or like Casey Neistat who's pretty cool. You are a creator. Even if it's on a blog, even if it's on tik tok, Instagram, your career that

Pauline Narvas :

was really inspiring. That was incredible. I mean, like, for me, I think it's just echoing what you've already said. My key advice would be, just do it for you. It's really easy to get caught up in like what everyone else is doing, like all those big tech youtubers or those big like content creators on YouTube and all sorts of stuff and they see that they're really successful and everything. It can get quite easy just to be caught up on what they're doing and how you can become the next whatever. But my challenge to you is how can you be the next Do you How can you put your unique foot forward that you you really show the world that this is me, you know cue: "This is me" by Demi Lovato but like, you know how can you show that your unique perspective don't follow someone's footsteps like exactly just to get to where you think is like the end game or the end goal when I mean they Everyone has different journeys so just focus on your own journey. Before we end this episode think like do you want to like just tell people where they can find you?

Clark Narvas :

at @clark.narvas. Actually, I could just you know, I could just put put down when you'd like links page: links.clarknarvas.com

Pauline Narvas :

Thank you to everyone who has tuned in to this episode. We both hope that you got a lot of value out of it. And I'm sure you'll see Clark on another or hear Clark on another episode on a podcast by Pauline you can find me on Twitter at Polina Instagram Pauline, and find out more and read my blog on pauline.com thanks again everyone. That's it for this episode and we'll speak to you

Clark's Creator Journey
Finding communities
Filming Hackathons at The University of Sheffield
Does consistency matter?
The Impact of Creating
Content Anxiety, Imposter Syndrome & Haters
Advice to those starting out